Library/Computer Class Second Quarter 2012-2013 6th grade

Geography’s Impact on Humanity

Big 6 Skill 1: Task Definition
Working alone or in pairs, students create a “journey” that includes two different locations (villages, towns, cities, states, provinces, or countries) to analyze and research. The student “journey” can be inspired by almost anything, including historical fact, personal experience (including past and present family experiences), works of literature, or various combinations of these. At least one of the locations must be in a Latin American country. Students will explore and discover how the geography of their selected locations has impacted human characteristics of place (e.g. food traditions, technology, transportation, migration, festivals, religion, economic activity, literature, the arts [painting, sculpture, music, dance, theatre, architecture, sports, etc.], etc.).

Students complete a minimum of NINE (9) of the following ELEVEN (11) KEY ELEMENTS in their final project. Elements marked with an asterisk (*) are REQUIRED. Extra credit is available for completing additional elements. .

* One: Physical Maps/Absolute Location – A.) Student projects feature a single world map with both of their locations clearly marked. B.) Students state the names of both locations and provide the absolute location (the definitive location of a place [longitude and latitude]).


a)

world-map-children-s.jpg

b)

Sinaloa,Culiacan, Mexico

24° N, 107° W

State of Florida

25º N, 80º W




* Two: Physical Maps/Relative Location – A.) Student projects feature maps of both of their locations (TWO maps) clearly marked on continental or regional maps. B.) Students state the names of both locations and describe the relative location of each (its relationship to other places or nearby landmarks).

a)
sinaloa mapa.gif

map of mexico with sinaloa.gif
Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico



Culiacan
is north of mazatlan and southeast of topolebampo.


b)

maps-united-states-2a.jpg




florida
The Florida panhandle lies south of the states of Georgia and Alabama. The main part of Florida is east of the Gulf of Mexico and west of the Atlantic Ocean.




* Three: Description of Geography – A.) Students provide a brief description of the geography of their first location (landforms, bodies of water, climate, plant life [flora], and animal life [fauna]). B.) Students provide a brief description of the geography of their second location.

a)

Sinaloa,Culiacan, Mexico

City, capital of Sinaloa estado (state), northwestern Mexico. Situated on the Culiacán River about 50 miles (80 km) inland from the Gulf of California, it lies on a small coastal plain, about 200 feet (60 metres) above sea level. To the east rises the lofty Sierra Madre Occidental. Founded in 1531, Culiacán was an important early base for Spanish expeditions. The city is now a regional commercial and service centre. Its manufactures include processed tomatoes and other foods, beer, paper products, and cotton textiles. The city provides financial and administrative support for mines in the mountains that extract zinc, gold, lead, manganese, and other minerals. In the valley an elaborate irrigation system provides for a great variety of crops, including corn (maize), sugarcane, tobacco, and fruits and vegetables that are exported to the United States. Culiacán is the seat of the Autonomous University of Sinaloa (founded 1873) and other universities and technical colleges. It has an international airport and is connected by rail and highway with Heroica Nogales (in Sonora), Mexico City, and the ports of Mazatlán and Guaymas. Pop. (2000) 540,823; (2010) 675,773

Culiacán. ( 2012). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from http://school.eb.com/eb/article-9028149

The capital of Sinaloa, (Culiacan).Situated on the Culiacan River about 50 miles inland from the Gulf of California. It lies on a small flat land on the Pacific coast,about 200 feet above sea level.They produce processed tomatoes and other foods,beer, paper products, and cotton cloth or goods produce by weaving,knitting,or felting.From the mines in the mountains they gather zinc,gold,lead,manganese,and other minerals.



b)
Florida:

Florida is home to 45 terrestrial ecosystems that range from small islands of subtropical hammocks and rocklands to vast dry prairies, sandhills, scrubs, flatwoods and floodplain forests. And despite having little change in elevation, the difference of a few feet on the Florida peninsula can yield major landscape variations. Within flatwoods, for example, nearly imperceptible drops in elevation create a mosaic of depression marshes, dome swamps, and wet prairies. The topography changes more dramatically in the Panhandle where high bluffs and steep ravine systems flank the Apalachicola River and its tributaries.
The state’s 1,200 miles of coastline, including estuaries, seagrass beds, mangrove swamps, and coral reefs, together with thousands of inland freshwater lakes, rivers, streams and springs, support numerous aquatic communities. Florida’s current and historic coastlines also influence its geology. Rising and receding seas deposited great quantities of limestone over many thousands of years, resulting in an abundance of karst features such as sinkholes, caves, depressions, limestone outcrops and more than 300 large artesian springs. A series of sand ridges in the central peninsula were once islands surrounded by a vast sea, isolating plants and animals that evolved into unique species. The state’s peninsular geography spans temperate and subtropical zones, which, combined with its distinctive geology and climate, contribute to habitat diversity as well as an amazing array of species.
Florida’s geography can be divided into natural categories such as watersheds, corridors and ecoregions that can help in conservation planning and priority setting.

Florida has 45 terrestrial ecosystems that spread from small islands of subtropical hammocks and rocklands to vast dry prairies,sandhills,scrubs,flatwoods and floodplain forests.in flatwood the drops of elavation create a moasaic of depression marshes, dome swamps,and wet prairies.The features changes more frequently in the panhandle where high bluffs and steep ravine systems flank the Apalachicola River and its streams.



* Four: Photographs of locations – A.) Students include photos of geographical features of both locations. B.) Students describe the pictured geographical features of both locations using correct geographical terminology (see glossary posted on project website).

a)

sinaloa,culiacan:

Botanical_Garden_ culiacan.jpg

sinaloa,culiacan botanic garden only has tropical plants that survives its climate
the plants are very special because when i went there i never seen those plants before
my favorite part of the botanic garden is the image that i put.


Florida:


external image 0.jpg

This garden is part of florida. This garden is big and have alot of plant and rivers. People like to visit
because they can see the fishes and their is turtles on some of the rocks too.

* Five: Human characteristics of place – A.) Students identify and describe one or more human characteristics of place of their first location. B.) Students identify and describe one or more human characteristics of place of their second location.


a)
Culturally, it is known for a style of music known as banda, and corrido is also popular. It is the only place in the continent where the ancient ball game of Mesoamerica is still played, in a handful of small, rural communities not far from Mazatlán. The


ball game was central in the society, religion and cosmology of all the great Mesoamerican cultures including the Mixtecs, Aztecs, and Maya.A Ulama player in Sinaloa.

The Sinaloa version of the ball game is called ulama, and is very similar to the original.[12] There are efforts to avoid the extinction of this 3500-year old unique tradition by supporting the communities and children who still play it.[13]

Famous entertainers from Sinaloa have included the actress/comedian/singer Sheyla Tadeo, born in Culiacan; actors Pedro Infante, Jorge Orta and Sabine Moussier, Mazatlan natives all; and actress/singer Lorena Herrera, also born in Mazatlan.

Culturally, Sinoloa is known for a style of a music knownas banda, and corrido is also famous there. Sinoloa is is the only place on the continent where the ancient ball game of Mesoamerica (created by the aztecs) is still being played in a handful of small,ranch communitiesnot far from Mazatlan. The ball game was central in the society, religion and cosmology of all the great Mesoamerican cultures including the Mixtecs,Aztecs and the Mayas.The sinaloa version of the ball game is called ulama.There version is very similiar to the original.


b)external image dot.gifNative Americans, the original inhabitants of Floriconstitute only a tiny percentage of the state's population. In the early 21st century about 2,500 Seminole were living on several reservations in the southern part of the state. Most of these were the descendants of those Seminole who successfully resisted being forcibly removed to the Oklahoma Territory by the U.S. govern the 19th century.
external image dot.gifFlorida's black poased greatly as a result of U.S. rule, as large numbers of African slaves were brought in to work the plantations. By 1830 the African American of Florida were about equal. Beginning in the late 19th century, however, new migrations of white settlers began to shift the balance. By 2010 African Americans totaled 16 percent of the population, and whites acfor 75 percent. Significant numbers of Cubans began immigrating to the state after the Cuban revolution of the 1960s, and another wave began arriving in the 1980s. More than 22 percent of Florida's population identified themselves as Hispanic in 2010. Sizable Jewish communities have also developed

The Native Americans, the original permanent residents of florida,now establish only a small percent of the state's population. In the early 21st century about 2,500 Seminole are living on several reservations in the art of the state. Most of these were the offspring of those seminole who abstained from being forced to be ejected to the oklahby the U.S goverment in the 19th cridas black population grew greatly as a result of U.S rule large numbers of african slaves to work the plantations. By 1830 the african american and white populations of florida were a bit equal. At the biginning of the late 19th century's, the new migrations of white setvjgan to shift the balance. By 2010 African Americans totaled 16 percent of the population, and whites accounted for 75 percent. Significant numbers of cubans began comming in State after the cuban revolution of the 1960s,and another wave began arriving in the 1980s.more than 22 percent of florida`s population identified themselfs as hispanic in 2010, Sizable Jewish communites have also developed.


* Six: Connecting geography to culture – A.) Students identify a connection between a geographical feature of their first location and a human characteristic of place of their first location. B). Students identify a connection between geography and a human characteristic of place for their second location. For both A and B students employ the “claim, evidence, reasoning” technique.
a)
The coastal plain is a narrow strip of land that stretches along the length of the state and lies between the ocean and the foothills of the Madre Occidental Range, which dominates the eastern part of the state. Sinaloa is traversed by many rivers, which carve broad valleys into the foothills. The largest of these rivers are the Culiacán, Fuerte, and Sinaloa.
Sinaloa has a warm climate on the coastal side, moderately warm in the valleys and foothills, moderately cold in the lower mountains and cold in the higher elevations. Its weather characteristics vary from subtropical, found on the plains, to cold in the nearby mountains. Temperatures range from 22 °C (72 °F) to 43 °C (109 °F) with rains during the summer.
Numerous species of plants and animals are found within Sinaloa. Notable among the tree species is the elephant tree, Bursera

b)
Human characteristic of Florida would include Disney World and other parks, zoos, museums (Dali Llama) , theaters, restaurants, and other buildings or outdoors activities created by humans

The human characteristics of Florida would include Disney world and other parks too created buy humans

Seven: Connecting history to human characteristics of place – A.) Students identify a connection between the history of their first location and a human characteristic of place of their first location. B.) Students identify a connection between the history of their second location and a human characteristic of place of their second location. For both A and B students employ the “claim, evidence, reasoning” technique.

a)
Indian peoples lived in what is now Sinaloa for centuries before Spanish explorers came to Mexico in the 16th century. When the Spanish reached Sinaloa in the early 1530s, they encountered Mayos, Ocoronis, and many other Indian groups. The Spanish conquered the land and exploited its mineral wealth by setting up mines, using Indians as slave labor. The Spanish also established missions to convert the Indians to Roman Catholicism. Some Indians rebelled, but the Spanish quelled the uprisings. From the 1560s the Spanish ruled Sinaloa as part of a province called Nueva Vizcaya. In 1733 aloa and the territory of Sonora, to the north, became a separate territory called Sonora y Sinaloa. The two remained united after Mexico gained independence from Spain in 1821. In 1830 they became separate states. Population (2005 census), 2,608,442

Mostly indian people lived in sinaloa for centuries before spanish explores came to mexico. When the spanish explorers reached sinaloa they
come across mayos, ocoronis, and may other Indian groups. The spanish explorers brung the land to its knees and exploited its mineral wealth by setting up mines using indians as slave people.
b)
Ancient Native American peoples called paleo-indians entered Florida from the north asearlyas 12,000 years ago. Although the first of farming dates from about 500 BC, some southern groups remained hunters, fishers, and gatherers until their extinction. Indigenous peoples continued to arrive from the north in small numbers after 500 BC, establishing contacts with Cuba, the Bahamas, and, possibly, the Yucatán region of Mexico. At the time of European contact in the16th century, a population of several hundred thousand Native Americans lived in Florida.

Ancient native americans(paleo-indians)entered in florida from the north asearlyas 12,000 years ago. Even if the first of farming from 500 BC, some southern groups remaind hunters,fishers,and gatherers before their death.Homegrown people continued to arrive from the north in small numbers after 500 BC, setting up contacts with Cuba, the Bahamas, and ,by any challange, the Yucatan region of Mexico.At the time of European contact in the 16th century, a population of a few hundred thousand Native Americans lived in florida.

*Eight: Challenges – A.) Students identify past or present challenges or threats to the well-being of the inhabitants of ONE location on their journeynd indicate whether or not these challeor threats are related in any way to the geography of the location. B.) Students will report what efforts are being made to confront thesllenges.

a)
Large drainage projects were launched, shortly after the year 1900. Many canals were built. These canals lowered the level of Lake Okeechobee. The lowering of Lake Okeechobee inhibited the lakes natural tendency to to overflow into the everglades. Urban growth along the Atlantic coastal strip accelerated after World War I. More and more water was diverted from the everglades. Almost simultaneously, an agriculture zone was developed south of Lake Okeechobee. Farming soon consumed huge quantities of water.

b)
Farming should be moved somewhere else because this is causing a lot of damage and a drout to the everglades.

Nine: Connecting geography to literature – Students with an established connection between ONE location and a work of literature (book or short story) will detail the connection, providing the following: A.) a brief summary of how why the action took place in the given locations; and B.) a brief summary of how the geogrical features of the location impacted the story’s setting.

Ten: Connecting geography to personal experience – Students with a personal connection to ONE OR BOTH locations provide a detailed description of the penal connection to the lotion or locations. Students arencouraged to gather information from family or community members and to report that information (attributed to those individuals) in their projects.

Eleven: Artwork – A.) Students include an image (e.g. photograph, work of visual art, etc.) that is symbolic of ONE OR BOTH location(s) on their journey. B.) Students provide analysis of the image (e.g. artist information, medium, year created, artist commentary). If the image is the work of an IAMS art student, commentary about the artwork by the snt artist is included.
a)

artwork of the world of color.jpg
drawing of the world of color in florida,orlando.


b) In florida there is the world of color.In the show you can see all the characters from disney.The show is in the water, the water changes color and through the water you can see the characters from disney. The people who made the show they made the characters talk in the show and the movement in the water to see the wonderful world of color.


Big 6 Skill 2: Information Seeking Strategies
Students select approved online resources and print resources using SOAR. Students complete the website evaluation form posted on the project wiki to verify the validity of any online resources not on the recommended list OR consult with a teacher for approval.

Big 6 Skill 3: Location and Access
Students utilize search terms to locate print and digital items to support research. Students seek other good search terms to enhance the success of their searches.

Big 6 Skill 4: Use of Information
Students read, reread, and analyze relevant items to identify and extract information needed information to address at least nine key elements listed under Task Definition.
Students save and organize information using Wikispaces.com as a communication and collaboration tool. Students create and populate pages on their research wikis with the following:
    • fmKey elements – For information addressing information requirements detailed in the key elements;
    • Relevant images – For uploading relevant images (with URL’s inserted beneath each image);
    • Citations and Links – For bibliography citations for all items used in this project in APA format (citations provided in the sources or citations generated by Son of Citation Machine http://citationmachine.net/ )
  • Presentation scripts – to be approved by teacher before making recordings or giving live presentations

Big 6 Skill 5: Synthesis
Students organize information from multiple sources and organize it in a logical manner to create a narrated slideshow using PowerPoint or Keynote (iPad) and Voicethread.com. The slide presentations will feature graphic images (photos, illustrations, etc.) and minimal text in a large font size. Students compose scripts on their research wikis (one per slide) to be read aloud by all group members in their voicethread recordings.

Voicethreads must contain the following:
1.) Information which addresses at least nine key elements
2.) Bibliography with APA-style citations for all resources utilized (minimum of five)

Big 6 Skill 3: Evaluation
Students will utilize the evaluation rubric throughout the process to ensure completion of all requirements. Students will view . They will provide feedback to one another both orally and in writing.